Social Security’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) And How It Differs From Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is responsible for the administration of two similar but distinctively different programs that work to augment the incomes of people who are not able to work due to a medical disability such as being subject to frequent seizures, being blind or having another condition that limits the ability to work.

While both programs are a big part of the safety net for the disabled, there is one major difference between SSI and SSDI — this difference is eligibility based upon your work record.

Put My 25 Years Of Experience To Work For You

Many potential Social Security beneficiaries choose to hire an experienced Social Security Disability attorney to aid them in filing their disability claims. And that's because the SSA's way of handling disability claims is complex, frustrating and difficult for most.

If you are disabled and planning to file, or have filed and been denied Social Security Disability benefits, let The Law Center for Social Security Disability help you. With over a quarter-century of experience, I know what needs to be done — and I know how to do it. My name is Gary Jones, and I am proud to have represented disabled individuals in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, since 1992.

Social Security Disability Income

SSDI is a program that is offered to workers who have paid into the Social Security system through Social Security withholdings. On your pay stub it was listed as FICA.

Funds for paying SSDI come from the tax revenues paid into the Social Security system by employers, employees and the self-employed. SSDI is only available to people who have collected enough Social Security credits as calculated from their lifetime payroll tax contributions. Below are the minimum credits required:

  • A worker under the age of 24 may qualify for SSDI if they have a minimum of six work credits during the three-year period before your disability began.
  • A worker between the age of 24 and 31 may qualify for SSDI if you worked at least half the period before your disability began. So, if you became disabled at age 29 you need at least four years of work.
  • A worker over the age of 31 may qualify for SSDI if they have a minimum of 20 work credits or quarters. At least 20 of the credits must have been earned during the 10 years preceding your disability onset. Please refer to the chart below.
Age Work Credits Needed
31-4220
4422
4624
4826
5028
5230
5432
5634
5836
6038
62 or older40

Other Benefits Under SSDI

  • Following two years of receiving SSDI, a disabled worker is automatically enrolled in Medicare.
  • SSDI benefits are also available to worker's minor children. The children can receive up to half of the disabled workers primary insured amount.
  • SSDI benefits can be paid to your adult child if they have been disabled since they were children, (under the age of 22).
  • A monthly benefit amount is based on the insured's earning record. The higher a worker's salary was for Social Security purposes the higher the monthly SSDI payment is. If you qualify for SSDI benefits, your monthly payments will be calculated based on your income, the number of years you worked, your age and your projected date of retirement. On average, SSDI pays about 40 percent of a person's pre-retirement income.

There is a five-month waiting period between initial filing and the first payment for SSDI. No payments are made or accrued during the waiting period. After the waiting period a disabled worker can receive a lump sum accrued benefit. Then the monthly benefits will begin.

An experienced disability lawyer may be able to streamline your claim by filing it for you and making sure the claim is complete and correct. This lessens the chances of it be returned, rejected or denied due to lack of proper information.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is defined as a welfare program. It is available to disabled people whose impairments prevent them from working. Unlike Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), SSI does not require the applicant to have a work history. This makes it possible for people who are not eligible for SSDI to receive benefits under the SSI program without consideration of the work credits required for SSDI. Both disabled adults and children can file for SSI.

The monthly SSI payment is currently based on the federal rate of $733. However, it can be less depending on your income, other financial resources and other household income. You may also be eligible to receive past due benefits, Medicaid benefits and/or food stamps.

Put My 24 Years Of Experience To Work For You

At The Law Center for Social Security Disability, I will explain both SSDI and SSI and help you understand your eligibility under the programs. Then, I can help guide you through the application process. Do not file the claim without an experienced Social Security Disability attorney to aid you. The SSA's process of handling disability claims is complex, frustrating and difficult for most.

If you are disabled and planning to file, or have filed and been denied Social Security Disability benefits, let The Law Center for Social Security Disability help you. Call 405-896-8852 or email me to discuss your case with a trusted lawyer. I understand that you need help now. You can count on me to act quickly to file your claim, gather the necessary documentation and pursue an appeal if necessary.

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